The Note Passer

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Guide to Ethical Swimwear


It’s finally starting to feel like Spring here in New York. I’m transitioning my wardrobe for warmer weather which, of course, got me thinking about swimwear. I started shopping ethically back in October, so this is the first time I’ve faced the already difficult challenge of finding a swimsuit plus the ethical quandary. 

The search for ethical swimwear brands is daunting. I think the fabric poses a special challenge to the process. Most conventional suits are made of synthetic fibers like polyester and nylon, which are made from petrochemicals that have significant environmental impacts. In addition, nylon manufacturing creates nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas. 

Most of the brands I found utilize recycled or Oeko-tex certified textiles and eco-friendly dyes, offset with renewable energy, reduce waste, reduce water consumption, and/or form partnerships with non-profits. However, each brand approaches ethics in its own way. Take a look at the possibilities below and click through to learn more about the brands and styles.

Click to enlarge. Hover for details.


Ethical Approaches

Some brands use conventional materials, but try to mitigate their impact with the rest of the process. For example, the brand Cala Ossidiana uses a nylon/Lycra blend fabric from an Italian mill run on sustainable power. They recycle and reduce water consumption, participate in World Land Trust, and run their business locally in NYC. 

Other brands, like Nikki Saya, make their suits from sustainable soy, organic cotton, bamboo, and other natural fibers. Vitamin A swimwear uses EcoLux™ green fibers, a superfine matte jersey manufactured from recycled nylon fiber. Eco-swim, as well, uses recycled materials for some of their swimwear. LUZ swimsuits are made of certified organic cotton and must be treated with care. CurleeBikini Swimwear is made solely from remnant, vintage, and organic fabrics, as are those from Billy and Lola. Designer Natalie Golonka creates swimwear made from vintage fabrics she has collected during her travels around the globe.

Still others, like RubyMoon, turn their profits into micro loans which help women entrepreneurs throughout the developing world. African brand laLesso works with SOKO, an independent eco and ethical clothing production unit that supports local talent and provides employment to Kenyans. Amitiwi swimwear is made of eco-friendly fabrics screen printed by hand on Bathurst Island by Tiwi artists using traditional methods which supports aboriginal art and the development of sustainable art centers in remote Australia. As a company owned and run by women, the team at Zero + Maria Cornejo endeavors to develop collaborations with women artisans around the world.

Check out more options at:

And if none of these do it for you, you can make your own bikini from an old t-shirt or have one custom made!

On another note, I was pleased to see more diversity than I did when I researched lingerie brands. One of my favorite in the bunch, Bombshell Bay, is committed to designing for all shapes and sizes and never testing products on underweight or underage models. All brands should commit to this and make more effort in regards to body size, conformity, and ableism. 


While the ethical options for women are fairly slim, for men, the situation is downright dire. Of the few brands carrying men’s options, my favorite is Riz. Riz creates colorful board shorts from 100 percent recycled and recyclable polyester, print with water-based, earth-friendly inks, and run a recycling program called "Rizcycling".  Faherty and Tyr use recycled fabrics as well. Brands Onia and Glass are both manufactured in NYC.

As you can see, there are many ways to address the ethical issues of materials, production, employment, and profit. This makes it difficult to determine the best ethical options even among what are considered ethical brands! I’m providing some direction here, but everyone has different priorities and you all have to decide for yourselves what’s most important to you. 


Get the watercolor brushes I used for the title free on WEGRAPHICS.


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Filed under ethical swimwear Awitiwi Fables by Barrie Billy and Lola Zinke Kelly B Curlee Bikini Ruby Moon laLesso Bombshell Bay Tyr Nikki Saya LUZ Jungle Gurl Zero + Maria Cornejo Araks Faherty Onia Riz

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Guest Post: Rubber Stamp Making 201 with Tortoise & Lady Grey

Today’s post is by Summer Edwards of the sustainable fashion blog, tortoise & lady grey. From her home in Australia, Summer works tirelessly to promote ethical and sustainable wardrobe choices and a slow fashion lifestyle. Her efforts have helped her to accumulate knowledge from designers and brands, which she freely shares on tortoise & lady grey, along with reviews, slow fashion skills, textile craft tutorials, and organic beauty products. If you like The Note Passer, you’ll love tortoise & lady grey.

In Rubber Stamp Making 101, Summer showed us the simplest way to start stamping. In 201, she will show us how to design and cut our own stamps.



Cutting your own rubber stamp designs

Once you’ve given the absolute beginner techniques a go, you can try your hand at cutting your own designs into erasers. To begin making your own personalised stamps, you will need:

  • A number of erasers - these can be rectangular, square or any other shape you might like to work with, as long as the face is flat (some erasers will have the brand name in raised letters on the face of the eraser - make sure you don’t select this type).
  • A set of lino cutting tools. A basic set of 6 cutting tools should give you enough versatility to cut a variety of shapes/designs.
  • A pencil for drawing your designs on the eraser
  • A cutting board or mat to protect your work surface

Instructions

  • To begin, you will need to draw your design on the surface of your eraser. Keep in mind the the more detailed the design, the more difficult it will be to carve. It is best to start with simple shapes and straight lines- these are easiest to carve. Below I’ve drawn a stripe design and a simple design of three rectangles onto my erasers. 


Designs such as these are much easier to work with as a beginner while you get the hang of using the carving tools. 



  • With the cutting board on your work surface, place the eraser on the cutting board, and use the cutting tools to cut away the excess rubber from around your design (this is the negative space of the design). You will need to experiment a little to choose which blade shape works best for the different edges of your design. Take it slowly and try a few different tools until you have the one that feels best to cut the rubber from around your design.
  • Take care to only cut about ¼ inch deep or less; if you cut any deeper, you risk cutting your eraser in two. Make sure that you keep a few extra erasers on hand so that if this does happen you can just start again. Practice makes perfect!


Whether you wish to print on textiles or on paper with the stamps you’ve carved, I recommend using a foam roller rather than a paint brush to spread the paint onto your stamp. This provides more even coverage when working with carved stamps. 

Technique for Printing on Fabric

The stamps you’ve created can easily be used on paper with acrylic paint. For this you will just need paint, paper, and a foam roller. If you want to use them on fabric you’ll need an extra step to ensure the design is set properly and colourfast. For printing on fabric you will need:

  • A t-shirt/tea-towel/pillowcase or any other piece of fabric you might like to print on (choose organic if available)
  • Textile printing ink in the colours that you wish to work with
  • A foam roller for spreading the ink 
  • An old plate or large paint palate for inking up the roller
  • A piece of cardboard (an old ceral box will do) or a cutting board to place under the fabric and stop ink from coming through the fabric onto your table or the reverse side of the t-shirt or pillowcase
  • An iron & ironing board

When choosing your printing ink, look for solvent-free ink, which will ensure that no harmful chemicals will be used in your project. You will also have two options for printing ink: opaque or transparent. Opaque ink will sit on top of the fabric, whereas transparent ink will colour the fabric, but not sit on top of the fabric surface. I personally prefer to work with transparent ink as I think opaque ink can appear quite amateur. But that is a personal preference, and you may feel that you prefer opaque. It just depends upon your personal preference for the project. 

Instructions

  • To begin with, you will want your fabric surface to be flat, so you might need to lightly iron the fabric to remove any creases or folds.
  • Before printing, place a cutting board or piece of cardboard under the fabric. If working with a t-shirt or pillowcase, the board should be placed in between the two layers, so that no ink soaks through to the bottom layer of the item.
  • Place some ink on the plate/palate and roll the foam roller over the ink until there is a good coating on the roller.
  • Use the roller to ink up your rubber stamp and carefully print your stamp onto your fabric.
  • Repeat the last step. Make sure you ink up your rubber stamp each time you wish to print on the fabric. If you are unhappy with the coverage of one print, you can carefully go over it with the newly inked stamp, or you can try to touch it up with a paint brush. As you work, you will work out the optimal pressure to give a good coverage the first time, but this might take you a couple of times to perfect. 

Here’s a t-shirt I printed with one of the designs:



  • Once you have completed your printed design, you will need to leave your work to dry completely. This will take several hours. Make sure that you leave the board in place whilst the fabric print is drying.
  • When it is completely dry, you will need to iron your print to set the ink. Follow the instructions for your particular ink for the time and temperature required to set the ink with your iron.
  • Once set with the iron, you will be able to wash the fabric in the washing machine as you normally would for the type of fabric you’ve printed on. 

If you’d like a more detailed look a printing on fabric, check out my tutorial for simple printing on a t-shirt. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed my introduction to printing techniques and it gives you the inspiration to give printing a go for yourself. It is a simple technique that anyone can master and once you get started you’ll be encouraged by how many creative personalised items you can create for your own home and wardrobe or to gift to others.

This post is one of a three-part collaboration between tortoise & lady grey and The Note Passer. In part 2, I will teach readers how to make a more detailed stamp design as an intermediate tutorial. This will be published on tortoise & lady grey on May 12th. Part 3 will continue the printing subject with creative project by The Note Passer, to be published here in June. Keep an eye out for them both, and happy printing!


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Filed under tortoiseandladygrey.com rubber stamp tutorial DIY

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Guest Post: Rubber Stamp Making 101 with Tortoise & Lady Grey

Today’s post is by Summer Edwards of the sustainable fashion blog, tortoise & lady grey. From her home in Australia, Summer works tirelessly to promote ethical and sustainable wardrobe choices and a slow fashion lifestyle. Her efforts have helped her to accumulate knowledge from designers and brands, which she freely shares on tortoise & lady grey, along with reviews, slow fashion skills, textile craft tutorials, and organic beauty products. If you like The Note Passer, you’ll love tortoise & lady grey.



Welcome to Rubber Stamp Making 101, a tutorial that introduces you to this basic technique for printing on paper and fabric. Rubber stamping is a simple and versatile technique that can be used to personalise gift paper, cards, clothing, linen and more. 

I first became interested in rubber stamp making as an easy way for me to personalise my wardrobe and the gifts that I give to friends and family. I try to strictly buy sustainably and ethically produced products, but I found that sometimes these can lack a bit of personality. It is easy to find organic cotton tops, but they are usually so plain - not a polka dot or stripe in sight! And it’s easy to find recycled brown paper for wrapping, but it’s always just brown paper - not cute animal prints or florals. So rather than abandon my ethics, I decided to take design matters into my own hands. 

Techniques for Absolute Beginners

If you’re an absolute beginner, and a little nervous about the idea of cutting stamps or creating your own designs, the stationery store is a great resource to find interesting shapes to try stamping. There are range of erasers designed for children that come in a variety of shapes and are ideal for stamping. 



My recent trip to the stationery store uncovered erasers in the shape of basketballs (perfect for polka dot designs), footballs (another interesting shape), flowers (for a simple floral design), and alphabet letters (for creating typography). And let us not forget pencils with the small round eraser at the end; these are perfect for creating tiny polka dot designs. 



In this photo, I’ve created a simple wrapping paper pattern using circle and flower-shaped erasers to print on recycled paper. This project uses only acrylic paint and a paintbrush to spread the paint onto the eraser for printing. 

In the photo below, I’ve used watercolour paint and watercolour card. I created a confetti-inspired design by dipping the small eraser on the end of the pencil into watercolours and stamping onto the card. 



To try these simple techniques for yourself, all you need are some interesting erasers, some paint, some paper, and a paintbrush. Try acrylic paint and simple brown paper for wrapping paper, or watercolour on thick watercolour card for cards and gift tags.

IN THE NEXT POST: Summer will share how to make your own rubber stamps! 

You can check out more from Summer on tortoise & lady grey. You can also follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.


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Filed under tortoiseandladygrey.com rubber stamp DIY art ethical

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Forecast by Ashleigh Rosa Ninos

I am so enamored with the look of watercolor these days! In textiles, in design, and of course, in art. I recently chanced upon artist Ashleigh Rosa Ninos on Etsy and I loved her work immediately. I adore the muted monochromatic palettes and the watery beauty of her Forecast series. She describes Forecast as follows:

Using abstraction and minimal mark-making, I aim to capture the psychological weight weather carries whilst utilizing the inherent properties of paper itself: it soaks, warps, and stretches under the strain of water; stained as a trace to these events. 


Subtle coloring and a calming aesthetic are the gorgeous results. Now to decide which one I want to own!

You can purchase signed and dated originals from Ashleigh’s Etsy store or fine art prints on Artfully Walls. I also recommend following her art-focused Pinterest boards for inspiration.

Happy Weekend!


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Filed under Ashleigh Rosa Ninos Forecast watercolor art Etsy

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Forecast by Ashleigh Rosa Ninos

I am so enamored with the look of watercolor these days! In textiles, in design, and of course, in art. I recently chanced upon artist Ashleigh Rosa Ninos on Etsy and I loved her work immediately. I adore the muted monochromatic palettes and the watery beauty of her Forecast series. She describes Forecast as follows:

Using abstraction and minimal mark-making, I aim to capture the psychological weight weather carries whilst utilizing the inherent properties of paper itself: it soaks, warps, and stretches under the strain of water; stained as a trace to these events. 


Subtle coloring and a calming aesthetic are the gorgeous results. Now to decide which one I want to own!

You can purchase signed and dated originals from Ashleigh’s Etsy store or fine art prints on Artfully Walls. I also recommend following her art-focused Pinterest boards for inspiration.

Happy Weekend!


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Filed under Ashleigh Rosa Ninos Forecast watercolor art Etsy

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Forecast by Ashleigh Rosa Ninos

I am so enamored with the look of watercolor these days! In textiles, in design, and of course, in art. I recently chanced upon artist Ashleigh Rosa Ninos on Etsy and I loved her work immediately. I adore the muted monochromatic palettes and the watery beauty of her Forecast series. She describes Forecast as follows:

Using abstraction and minimal mark-making, I aim to capture the psychological weight weather carries whilst utilizing the inherent properties of paper itself: it soaks, warps, and stretches under the strain of water; stained as a trace to these events. 


Subtle coloring and a calming aesthetic are the gorgeous results. Now to decide which one I want to own!

You can purchase signed and dated originals from Ashleigh’s Etsy store or fine art prints on Artfully Walls. I also recommend following her art-focused Pinterest boards for inspiration.

Happy Weekend!


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Filed under Ashleigh Rosa Ninos Forecast watercolor art Etsy

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DIY Chain Stitch Monogram


I saw this the other day and decided I needed to learn to monogram. I asked my talented friend, Claudia of Sew You Studio, about this stitch and she informed me it’s called a “chain stitch” and sent me to this excellent tutorial. The tutorial is, as I say, excellent, so skip over there if you want to learn to chain stitch. It’s an easy technique - the only difficult part is getting the spacing right. 

Here’s what you’ll need:

  1. a needle of appropriate size
  2. embroidery thread of your color choosing
  3. an item to monogram


I decided to monogram my laptop sleeve, so I had to use a huge needle because I was embroidering thick felt. Also, embroidery thread is pretty thick if you use all of the strands (I did).


I penciled in the lines when practiced the technique a few days ago on a scrap of fabric. But the grey felt wouldn’t show pencil, so I just eyeballed the spacing and alignment. In hindsight, I probably could have used chalk lines. I did have to undo a few stitches, but this technique is pretty forgiving because it’s so loose. The most difficult part is getting the stitches evenly spaced - mine’s not perfect by any stretch, but I like the way it turned out. 

Also, the tutorial explains how to stitch a straight line and there’s no mention of how to “turn”. When I wanted to turn (like in the middle of the E) I made a small stitch just like the one I began with and then changed directions on that stitch. I made it small enough that it wouldn’t be too noticeable, but large enough to get the needle through. If I were doing a letter like a T, I would start a new line for the cross. I have no idea if this is technically what you should do, but it worked for me.


The whole thing took about 30 minutes and I think it makes a big difference on a plain item. Make sure you follow the detailed tutorial on Sublime Stitching here

If you don’t care to DIY it, check out my inspiration, W.B. Thamm, for some custom items (made right here in NYC).


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Filed under monogram Sew You Studio embroidery Sublime Stitching DIY

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Photo Club: Wes Anderson Day


Prologue:

On an overcast March day, the second meeting of Photo Club celebrated the opening of Wes Anderson’s new film, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Jim Kast-Keat, Krista Dalton, and I shot the house used in The Royal Tenenbaums and its neighborhood of Hamilton Heights, and attended opening night of The Grand Budapest Hotel.

Chapter One:

The Tenenbaum House



The house used as the Tenenbaum house is located on Convent Avenue in Upper Manhattan. The address is sometimes listed as number 339, but has 337 on the transom window. It is currently unoccupied and oh, how I wish I could own it. But without the soul-crushing amount of money required to buy real estate in Manhattan, I suppose I’ll have to be happy skulking around outside. It’s a really beautiful structure, as are many of the buildings in the area.

The overcast sky was a disappointment, but I find it interesting how the sky looks white in my photos. This is probably another aperture mistake on my part, but without any post-processing the buildings look cut out against a white sky. I kind of like the way it looks.


Chapter Two:

Hamilton Heights



Convent Avenue is a small street in the Upper Manhattan neighborhood known as Hamilton Heights, named after Alexander Hamilton who lived the last two years of his life in the area. Other notable residents include Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Norman Rockwell, and George Gershwin. 


Hamilton Heights is also home to the City College of New York which, in my opinion, has some of the most interesting architecture in the city. It was largely designed by George Browne Post in neo-Gothic style. Below are just a few of the grotesques which adorn the original buildings; six hundred in all, they represent the practical and the fine arts.


Chapter Three:

The Grand Budapest Hotel



The finale of our outing was The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson’s newest film. This post is long enough and I’m not much of a film critic, but I will say that I enjoyed the story and aesthetics of the movie. It’s not my favorite Wes Anderson movie, but I always appreciate the dialogue and elaborateness of his films. 

Epilogue:

We ended up a few other places that day, but I will share those photos another time. I don’t know Photo Club’s next event, but I love participating and sharing with all of you. Until then…


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Filed under New York City NYC Wes Anderson The Royal Tenenbaums Hamilton Heights The Grand Budapest Hotel City College of New York

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Warby Parker on the Upper East Side


Each of Warby Parker's stores reflect their unique locales and their newest store on Manhattan's Upper East Side is no exception. Located in a space formerly occupied by Lascoff Drugs, it retains the original terrazzo floors, cathedral ceilings, and gothic windows in homage to the building and neighborhood. I got a sneak peek at the space and couldn't get enough of the history meets hipster vibe.


The new space boasts art by Maira Kalman, a photo booth, a pneumatic tube system, reading nooks, an honor bar, and two eye exam rooms. Another innovation unique to this location is The Reference Desk, a one-stop shop for inquiries, check-ins, adjustments, and more.


This week was the grand opening, so if you’re in the area, stop by and say hi, chill out in a reading nook, or check out some new shades for Spring


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Filed under Warby Parker NYC New York City glasses

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Capsule Wardrobe

Ever since I began the Six Items Challenge, I’ve been thinking about capsule wardrobes, or what I like to call my “forever wardrobe”. The term capsule wardrobe was coined in the 1970s by Susie Faux, owner of London boutique, “Wardrobe”. The idea has been explored in the fashion industry, most notably by Donna Karan. In 1985, Karan released her “7 Easy Pieces” collection of interchangeable styles aimed at working women. But being that the goal is to reduce consumption, you can imagine why most brands would not be enamored with this concept.



I put together this collage as I thought about my own capsule wardrobe. Most of the items are from this Pinterest board, many of them long gone from their respective stores, but that’s not really the point. These pieces are inspirational and I would search for similar, but ethical alternatives (with the exception of the handbag from Angela Roi). As I get older, I’m drawn to pieces that are well-made, comfortable, and flattering over trendy. This perspective helps keep me off the fashion treadmill and open to ethical pieces that tend to be less flashy, but better cut and quality (and more expensive than fast fashion).  

As difficult a time I had choosing six items for six weeks, it would be even more difficult to choose forever pieces. Of course, some things will wear out, but I wonder what types of pieces stand the test of time and trend? What colors, materials, fits, and styles have longevity?

Help me out. What make a piece “forever”? What would be in your capsule wardrobe? Tell me in the comments!


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Filed under capsule wardrobe Six Items Challenge sixitemschallenge Susie Faux Donna Karan Vivienne Westwood quote Pinterest

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Six Items Challenge: My Picks

On Wednesday, I told you about the Six Items Challenge I’m participating in. I decided to take this opportunity to carefully go through my wardrobe as I chose my six items; I found a few items to send to Twice, a few for Yerdle, and deliberated until I chose THE six.



  1. a t-shirt bought at a Carsick Cars show
  2. a J.Crew sweater I just got from Twice
  3. a short-sleeve white blouse
  4. a vintage sheer black blouse
  5. black ankle length pants
  6. dark boyfriend jeans

As I made my choices, I relied heavily on this Pinterest board of classic looks. I hope it will also come in handy as I remix my options over the next six weeks! I stuck to a neutral color palette because I didn’t see anyway around that. The weather is still cold, so I went with pants. I’m a little concerned about the coming Spring weather, but I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it. I’ll be blogging over these six weeks about my challenges and motivations. 

If you’re interested in joining the challenge, please do! You can sign up here.


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Filed under ethical 6itemschallenge Twice Yerdle Six Items Challenge

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The Six Items Challenge


On Monday, I was contacted by Sarah from Made in USA Challenge about the Six Items Challenge. An initiative of the UK Labour Behind the Label campaign, it challenges participants to wear only six items of clothing for six weeks (excluding uniforms, workout clothes, socks, shoes, underwear, coats). The official rules can be found here.  Sarah is heading up a US branch of the initiative and I’ve decided to give it a go. I think it will push me to accept a smaller, tighter wardrobe and force me to use pieces creatively. I’ll be blogging about the pieces, challenges, and more over the six weeks.

If you’d like to participate, you can sign up here. If you have a blog and would like to join in and share, let me know in the comments or send me an email so we can link up. The challenge officially begins March 5th, but feel free to join in anytime!

P.S. While I don’t really “do” Lent, this challenge does follow the Lenten season if you’d like to participate in that way.


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Filed under Six Items Challenge Labour Behind the Label Made in USA Challenge

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OMG. Look at This Alphabet!

Entitled, The Landscape Alphabet, it was created in the 19th century by British artist L.E.M. Jones. The exquisite letters are made up of castles, trees, bridges, sailboats, and other rustic landscapes. I thought the OMG was funny, but here are some of my absolute favorites:



E for Elizabeth. How cool is this scene?!



I really love the ones of seascapes.




Get the whole alphabet at The British Museum website. They are open for personal use, but review the terms of use here. I think they would look great hung up in a child’s room!

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Filed under The British Museum L.E.M. Jones art The Landscape Alphabet design

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OMG. Look at This Alphabet!

Entitled, The Landscape Alphabet, it was created in the 19th century by British artist L.E.M. Jones. The exquisite letters are made up of castles, trees, bridges, sailboats, and other rustic landscapes. I thought the OMG was funny, but here are some of my absolute favorites:



E for Elizabeth. How cool is this scene?!



I really love the ones of seascapes.




Get the whole alphabet at The British Museum website. They are open for personal use, but review the terms of use here. I think they would look great hung up in a child’s room!

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Filed under The British Museum L.E.M. Jones art The Landscape Alphabet design

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Photo Club: Grand Central


My friends, Krista and Jim, and I have formed a photography club! We had our first outing in January to Grand Central Terminal. GCT is a fascinating structure and place to photograph strangers, but there are some challenges to overcome. Challenges include being in the way of people trying to get somewhere and lighting. Movement in low light is both a challenge and an asset, as you can see below. 


We couldn’t meet until evening, so natural light was non-existent and the indoor lighting casts everything in yellow. Photo club also unanimously decided to have a drink at Campbell Apartment prior to shooting; the large Prohibition Punch I imbibed probably did not help my technique, either. I subsequently did not set my white balance to correct for the yellow light. I did a lot of color balance corrections post process, or just made them black and white. AMATEUR TIP: Making a photo black and white can cover a multitude of sins like color balance or a boring shot. I think the contrast of a black and white photo often can take a boring shot and make the light and shadows more interesting. I even added grain to some which makes them look more like film shots. I don’t normally do this, but it seemed appropriate to GCT’s setting.


Ever the pragmatist, I decided to use my tipsy state to the extreme, lowered the aperture on my camera, and came away with some cool blurry light shots. Our friend, Jes, arrived later and was happy to play the role of model.

I’m looking forward to our next outing (and cocktail)! See more photo club here.

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Filed under photography Grand Central Terminal NYC photo club Campbell Apartment